Síndrome de Munchausen ou Transtorno Factício

Munchausen Syndrome: A Review of Patient Management

Lilian Wong, MD, MPH; Mark B. Detweiler, MD, MS

Psychiatric Annals

January 2016 – Volume 46 · Issue 1: 66-70

Posted January 14, 2016
DOI: 10.3928/00485713-20151130-02

Abstract

The management of Munchausen syndrome is fraught with complexities related to legality, ethics, and its inherent nature. An illustrative case of factitious aortic dissection is presented as well as a review of the literature for the management Munchausen syndrome, which includes strategies reported to be effective. Management of Munchausen syndrome requires a high index of suspicion, a good history, and thorough physical examination. Objective illnesses resulting from the factitious behavior should be treated, while avoiding unnecessary procedures. Early referral to a psychiatry team is critical as this may be an empathetic and face-saving approach for the patient. Regularly scheduled appointments, not dependent on the patient’s distress level, are associated with improved long-term prognosis. Patients with Munchausen syndrome can suffer considerable iatrogenic morbidity and mortality, and they place immense strain on the health care system. Physicians should be aware of the complexities of these cases, the management options, and the frequent need for psychiatry consultations [Psychiatr Ann. 2016;46(1):66–70.]

Munchausen syndrome is the most severe and chronic form of factitious disorder imposed on the self, with predominantly physical signs and symptoms, pseudologia fantastica, and peregrination (frequent traveling from one medical center to another) that often lead to recurrent hospitalizations. It tends to have a refractory course. Munchausen syndrome is unique because it is a psychiatric disorder that most frequently presents as an apparently severe illness in the non-psychiatric setting. Even though Munchausen syndrome is studied by most clinicians in training, the first case often leaves them feeling blindsided by the patient, creating a fractured clinician-patient rapport. Many clinicians remember their first Munchausen syndrome case as if they were seeing medicine through a distorted prism and struggle with residual conflicting thoughts, as the clinical and ethical implications can be challenging.

Munchausen syndrome was first described by Dr. Richard Asher in his landmark 1951 article.1 He had named the syndrome after Baron Hieronymus Carl Friedrich Munchhausen (1720–1797), a minor nobleman who had joined the Russian army to fight against the Turks. He rose to the rank of

cavalry man and retired to his estate in Bodenwerder, near Hanover, as a country gentleman in

cavalry man and retired to his estate in Bodenwerder, near Hanover, as a country gentleman in 1750. Rudolph Eric Raspe, possibly an acquaintance of the Baron’s, fled Germany for England when he was caught embezzling from a museum. To pay off debts, Raspe anonymously wrote several books, including an exaggerated account of the Baron’s tales, “Baron von Munchhausen’s Narrative of his Marvelous Travels and Campaigns in Russia,” which was published in London in 1778. The second edition was translated into German. The baron was age 65 years when the German translation appeared, and he became an instant celebrity.2 He pursued several lawsuits unsuccessfully to protect his name, and died an embittered man.3 The irony in the naming of Munchausen syndrome is that the Baron was simply an old gentleman who liked to spin yarns as after-dinner entertainment for his friends. The true villain was probably Raspe.4

The psychopathology of Munchausen syndrome is poorly understood, and its management is fraught with complexities related to legalities, ethics, and its inherent nature. Most published works consist of case reports, and there are no treatment studies.5,6 The aim of this article is to focus on management, which is often overlooked in the medical literature. A famous illustrative case from our medical center is included. This case of a patient with factitious aortic dissection is unique because it has been documented in the literature over a 10-year period, and yet the patient is still visiting doctors today seeking treatment. The second part of this article proposes a management approach that includes strategies reported to be effective.

Illustrative Case

A 31-year-old man was admitted to the cardiothoracic surgical (CTS) intensive care unit of our teaching hospital after being flown in from a smaller hospital for a possible aortic dissection. At intake, he stated upfront that he had Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) type IV diagnosed by skin biopsy resulting in a traumatic aortic dissection in Germany in 2004. EDS type IV, also known as Vascular Type EDS, is the most severe form of this heterogeneous disorder and is associated with spontaneous rupture of mediumsized arteries, including the aorta. Type A dissections usually require surgery. The patient reported having a median sternotomy, and a family history of EDS in his mother and Marfan’s syndrome in his late father. He claimed to have had three acute myocardial infarctions (in 2004, 2005, and 2009). Moreover, he produced a November 2011 report of a trans-esophageal echocardiogram done at a Michigan hospital stating “Type A dissection.” He claimed surgeons said he was “too high risk to operate on,” but that he should go to a hospital if he developed chest pain. He also said he suffered a subarachnoid hemorrhage in 2002 due to cerebral aneurysm and he was recently diagnosed with bilateral femoral head avascular necrosis. He reported a long list of drug allergies including several pain medications, all purportedly causing anaphylactic reactions. He initially refused a magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) because of “aneurysm clips” after his “prior sternotomy.” Contrast computed tomography (CT) of the chest was contraindicated because of his reported allergy to the contrast dye. A noncontrast CT of the chest showed only standard postoperative mediastinal surgical clips, which are not contraindications to MRA. His MRA revealed no aortic dissection.

His medical history was very dramatic and inconsistent. He said he had extensive medical knowledge, requested to have no visitors, and he refused to give consent for us to contact his family. He said he lived with his mother in Iowa and that he was visiting “church members” in the region. He claimed that he had finished college and seminary school and that he had been working as a pastor for 14 years after starting as a “youth pastor.” He reported meeting his fiancé online, and although they had never met, they were engaged and planning to marry in 2 years. He denied having a psychiatric history. The medical and social histories were presented without any notable distress, with stable vital signs and without the murmur of aortic insufficiency. There were no clinical features of EDS type IV other than the claimed history of aortic dissection. The patient specifically requested central line placement under ultrasound guidance. He presented old medical records with signs of chronic handling, highlighted in several areas, without documentation of prior sternotomy, although he did have an appropriately placed scar. Our psychiatry consult team was contacted when the unique features of the clinical picture alerted the CTS team to the possibility of Munchausen syndrome.

The patient’s story started unraveling when our CTS team contacted a major university medical center to discuss management options of this complex case, only to discover that this patient had presented there twice with similar complaints, background history, and the eventual diagnosis of factitious aortic dissection.7 We also learned that a case report of this patient had been published in 2006, with subtle variation in details.8 The report attracted two letters to the editor stating similar encounters at two other major heart centers, with one encounter at least 3 years earlier.7,9 This heart center cited multiple requests for transfer from other medical centers regarding this person.9 One other case report about this patient was found in another report’s bibliography that was not found in the initial literature search.10

The literature confirms that this patient has presented to more than 100 hospitals along the east coast of the United States over the course of about 10 years, and that he has succeeded in gaining costly evaluations, including a median sternotomy.11 He had incurred over $1 million in expenses, excluding physician reimbursement.11 These details demonstrate that even when Munchausen syndrome is strongly suspected, it is a risk to not investigate and almost impossible for physicians to forfeit proper evaluation for fear of missing real pathology, especially in this litigious age. These conflicts tend to create intense counter-transference in physicians encountering Munchausen syndrome, as they often perceive that their valuable time and efforts have been wasted.12 Inevitably, resources consumed by these patients delays care and uses resources needed for others with genuine pathology.13,14

Management of Munchausen Syndrome

Most physicians are uncomfortable diagnosing factitious disorders, of which Munchausen syndrome is the most extreme variant.15 Munchausen syndrome disrupts the normal physician- patient relationship, which is based on trust.16,17 When unmasked, Munchausen patients react in ways ranging from ambivalence to hysteria and denial of fabricating their illness. Adults often are reluctant to see psychiatrists and leave the hospital against medical advice.5,6,8,12,16,18–37 Children and adolescents, however, are more inclined to admit to their fabrications38–40 and are more inclined to agree to psychiatric follow-up.38–40

The recurring theme in this review points toward maintaining a high index of suspicion, but when should a clinician begin to suspect Munchausen syndrome? What evidence can help determine the intentional feigning of disease? The first step is to complete a detailed history and physical examination, using repetition as a confirmation tool in the effort to identify biopsychosocial inconsistencies.41 Consistently reported clues include dramatic presentations; inconsistent histories; recurrent illnesses that worsen or change after appropriate treatment; extensive medical knowledge; knowledge of hospital systems; an eagerness for invasive procedures; claiming specific diagnoses; and attempts to dictate treatment.30,34,37,42–49 There may also be a previous history of Munchausen behavior, use of aliases, and peregrination.30,34,43,50 Lack of stable relationships is common as these patients may have a history of neglect during childhood, disruptive family ties, poor interpersonal relationships, and estrangement from their families.5,44,51 Consequently, families are frequently unavailable for contact.49 Patients with Munchausen syndrome often have some medical training.34,52,53 However, in the Internet era with online scientific journals and disease-related web sites, patients no longer need much medical experience to engage in convincing disease fabrication.16,46,54

Appropriate tests should be done where indicated, as the diagnosis of Munchausen syndrome does require exclusion of real pathology. Kenedi et al.55 reviewed 190 articles describing laboratory and other tools that could aid clinicians in recognizing induced illness. Clinical judgment is clearly required in striking a balance between avoiding unnecessary and potentially risky tests and procedures and the dangers of reflex dismissal of patients’ complaints, because genuine illness may be present.6,16,30,34,44,56,57 Blacklisting, reporting of patients, and flagging in medical records have been suggested;6,31,58 however, this is controversial.49 It is evident that management must be based on objective signs and data, including corroboration of the patient’s history.34,59–61

It is notable that fatalities may result as a direct consequence of the patient’s factitious behavior.19,62,63 Once it is clear that the treatment team could be dealing with Munchausen syndrome, several different steps could proceed sequentially. Illness resulting from the patient’s factitious behavior should be treated. Due to the significant risks of unnecessary treatment, it is

important to obtain outside medical records and to contact previous providers or family. When emergent care is required, performing a search of the room and personal belongings without patient consent may be justifiable.8,16,23,29,34,42–44,64–67 Patient observation may be required for protection from further self-harm and to provide evidence of fabrication. This includes use of sitters or 24-hour video monitoring.34 The hospital legal team can be consulted to address concerns.23 Family members may encourage litigation when the patient does not seem to recover, and the patient may agree to avoid admitting to the true etiology of their problems.23 However, patients with Munchausen often withdraw their case from litigation due to the fear that a court case would expose the true nature of their disorder.23,68

It is consistently recommended that a psychiatry team be consulted as early as possible.23,24,26,29,30,31,34,39,48,49,51,53,58,64,66,69–76 The psychiatry team’s most important role is

to help the primary treatment team manage the patient in the safest, most appropriate way, which

includes setting compassionate but firm limits and steering the patient toward psychiatric care in

an empathic and face-saving nonconfrontational manner.34 Patients may react to confrontation

with symptom escalation to substantiate the legitimacy of their needs, putting themselves at risk

for more self-harm.77 Psychiatrists also have an important role in managing counter-transference

and helping health care staff realize that these patients have severe psychiatric problems that are

driving their medical fabrications.12 Many patients with Munchausen syndrome have histories of

parental neglect, childhood abuse, early losses, early illness that led to prolonged medical

treatment or hospitalization, recent life-stressors, poor family relationships, poor coping skills,

and attention and sympathy seeking in addition to repeated medical admissions at various medical centers without resolution of their symptoms.18,23,31,32,37,38,39,42,44,45,47,53,54,59,64,75,77

Comorbid personality disorders are common.12,34 For others, Munchausen syndrome could be a

means to control others, express rage, or enhance their self-esteem as they succeed in deceiving clinicians.5,17,23,33,54

Patients with Munchausen are often refractory to psychotherapy,78 although there are reports of success.5,29,40,66,79 Flexible, creative approaches that emphasize consistency and regular psychiatric outpatient follow-up appointments independent of the patient’s reported distress levels are associated with the most success.34,45,49,56,72 Regularly scheduled appointments with primary care physicians that are not dependent on medical crises also have been shown to provide object constancy while minimizing the need to fabricate illness to seek attention.5,23,39,49,80 Regularly scheduled appointments provide support that does not threaten patients’ self-esteem, as well as a basis for developing a trusting doctor-patient relationship.51 Having a stable support system with an ability to form and maintain relationships is associated with better prognosis.5,18 The primary care physician can be the gatekeeper that approves the tests and procedures recommended by specialists.81 If the patient’s family can be involved, they may be encouraged to pay more attention to the patient and less to the illness symptoms,76 and

support the patient’s requests for additional services and requests to accompany them to the hospital.80 In addition to treating psychiatric disorders,63 psychopharmacotherapy and behavioral strategies such as double-bind techniques, have been described in treating specific factitious dermatologic conditions. Low-potency antipsychotics have been effective in managing dermatitis artefacta.82

Conclusion

Patients with Munchausen syndrome may suffer considerable iatrogenic morbidity and mortality. They also place significant strain on the health care system. It is important for clinicians to include Munchausen syndrome in the differential diagnosis of difficult cases where there is an abundance of conflicting medical history details in patients with an unusual knowledge of medicine. Clinicians need to be aware of the management options and approaches for patients with Munchausen syndrome to avoid contributing to iatrogenic pathology. Although prognosis is poor, every patient with Munchausen syndrome should be given a chance for recovery, as the literature does include some successful treatment outcomes.

References

  1. Asher R. Munchausen syndrome. Lancet. 1951;1:339–341. doi:10.1016/S0140- 6736(51)92313-6 [CrossRef]
  2. Fisher JA. Investigating the Barons: narrative and nomenclature in Munchausen syndrome. Perspect Biol Med. 2006;49:250–262. doi:10.1353/pbm.2006.0024 [CrossRef]
  3. Pai-Dhungat JV. Munchhausen syndrome. Karl Frederic von Munchhausen (1720–1797). Postal stamps issued on Munchhausen. Sitting on a cannon ball–Czechoslovakia, 1970. Riding on severed horse–West Germany, 1970. J Assoc Physicians India. 2008;56:134.
  4. Patterson R. The Munchausen syndrome: Baron von Munchhausen has taken a bum rap. CMAJ. 1988;139:566:568–569.
  5. Feldman MD. Recovery from Munchausen syndrome. South Med J. 2006;99:1398–1399. doi:10.1097/01.smj.0000232977.80118.89 [CrossRef]
  6. Garvey R, Fitzmaurice B. Communication failure—Munchausen’s without frontiers. Ir Med J. 2004;97:21–22.
  7. Fedoruk LM, Kern JA. Munchausen syndrome and acute aortic dissection: letter 1. Ann Thorac Surg. 2006;82:1948; author reply 1948–1949. doi:10.1016/j.athoracsur.2006.06.009 [CrossRef]
  8. Hopkins RA, Harrington CJ, Poppas A. Munchausen syndrome and acute aortic dissection. Ann Thorac Surg. 2006;81:1947–1949. doi:10.1016/j.athoracsur.2005.02.037 [CrossRef]
  9. Estrera AL, Safi HJ. Munchausen syndrome and acute aortic dissection: letter 2. Ann Thorac Surg. 2006;82:1948. doi:10.1016/j.athoracsur.2006.07.078 [CrossRef]

10. Chambers E, Yager J, Apfeldorf W, Camps-Romero E. Factitious aortic dissection leading to

thoracotomy in a 20-year-old man. Psychosomatics. 2007;48:355–358. doi:10.1176/appi.psy.48.4.355 [CrossRef]

  1. Hopkins RA, Harrington CJ, Poppas A. Munchausen syndrome and acute aortic dissection. Ann Thorac Surg. 2006;82:1948; author reply 1948–1949. doi:10.1016/j.athoracsur.2006.09.019 [CrossRef]
  2. Pompili M, Mancinelli I, Girardi P, Tatarelli R. Countertransference in factitious disorders and Munchausen syndrome. Int J Psychiatr Nurs Res. 2004;9:1041–1043.
  3. DeWitt DE, Ward SA, Prabhu S, Warton B. Patient privacy versus protecting the patient and the health system from harm: a case study. Med J Aust. 2009;191:213–216.
  4. Powell R, Boast N: The million-dollar man. Br J Psych. 1993;162:253–256. doi:10.1192/bjp.162.2.253 [CrossRef]
  5. Fliege H, Grimm A, Eckhardt-Henn A, et al. Frequency of ICD-10 factitious disorder: survey of senior hospital consultants and physicians in private practice. Psychosomatics. 2007;48:60–64. doi:10.1176/appi.psy.48.1.60 [CrossRef]
  6. Caocci G, Pisu S, La Nasa G. A simulated case of chronic myeloid leukemia: the growing risk of Munchausen’s syndrome by internet. Leuk Lymphoma. 2008;49:1826–1828. doi:10.1080/10428190802179889 [CrossRef]
  7. Fisher JA. Playing patient, playing doctor: Munchausen syndrome, clinical S/M, and ruptures of medical power. J Med Humanit. 2006;27:135–149. doi:10.1007/s10912-006-9014-9 [CrossRef]
  8. Doherty AM, Sheehan JD. Munchausen’s syndrome–more common than we realize?Ir Med J. 2010;103:179–181.
  9. Norcliffe-Kaufmann L, Gonzalez-Duarte A, Martinez J, Kaufmann H. Tachyarrythmias with elevated cardiac enzymes in Münchausen syndrome. Clin Auton Res. 2010;20:259–261. doi:10.1007/s10286-010-0066-6 [CrossRef]
  10. Zibis AH, Dailiana ZH, Papaliaga MN, et al. Munchausen syndrome: a differential diagnostic trap for hand surgeons. J Plast Surg Hand Surg. 2010;44:222–224. doi:10.3109/02844310902746667 [CrossRef]
  11. Serinken M, Karcioglu O, Turkcuer I, Bukiran A. Raynaud’s phenomenon–or just skin with dye?Emerg Med J. 2009;26:221–222. doi:10.1136/emj.2008.062562 [CrossRef]
  12. Feldman MD, Miner ID. Factitious Usher syndrome: a new type of factitious disorder. Medscape J Med. 2008;10:153.
  13. Eisendrath SJ, Telischak KS. Factitious disorders: potential litigation risks for plastic surgeons. Ann Plast Surg. 2008;60:64–69. doi:10.1097/SAP.0b013e318049cc41 [CrossRef]
  14. Blyer SM, Casino A, Reebye UN. Munchausen syndrome: a case report of suspected self- induced temporomandibular joint subluxation. J Oral Maxillofac Surg. 2007;65:2371–2374. doi:10.1016/j.joms.2006.11.054 [CrossRef]
  15. Velazquez MD, Bolton J. Factitious disorder. Br J Hosp Med (Lond). 2006;67:548–549. doi:10.12968/hmed.2006.67.10.22065 [CrossRef]
  1. Luxembourg B, Mani H, Toennes SW, et al. Factitious anticoagulant-resistance as a cause of recurrent arterial bypass graft occlusions. Thromb Haemost. 2007;97:1046–1048.
  2. Rashidi A, Khodarahmi I, Feldman MD. Mathematical modeling of the course and prognosis of factitious disorders: a game-theoretic approach. J Theor Biol. 2006;240:48–53. doi:10.1016/j.jtbi.2005.08.025 [CrossRef]
  3. Martins WD, Vieira S, de Fátima Avila L. Interesting case: factitious illness (Munchausen’s syndrome) report of a case. Br J Oral Maxillofac Surg. 2005;43:365. doi:10.1016/j.bjoms.2004.06.022 [CrossRef]
  4. Stern TA. Is your patient faking?Med Econ. 2004;81:60–63.
  5. What you need to know about… Munchausen’s syndrome. Nursing Times. 2004;100:31.
  6. Tausche AK, Hänsel S, Tausche K, et al. Case number 31: nodular panniculitis as expression of Munchausen’s syndrome (panniculitis artefacta). Ann Rheum Dis. 2004;63:1195–1196. doi:10.1136/ard.2004.024539 [CrossRef]
  7. Falagas ME, Christopoulou M, Rosmarakis ES, Vlastou C. Munchausen’s syndrome presenting as severe panniculitis. Int J Clin Pract. 2004;58:720–722. doi:10.1111/j.1368- 5031.2004.00269.x [CrossRef]
  8. Gill CJ, Hamer DH. “Doc, there’s a worm in my stool”: Munchausen parasitosis in a returning traveler. J Travel Med. 2002;9:330–332. doi:10.2310/7060.2002.30179 [CrossRef]
  9. Huffman JC, Stern TA. The diagnosis and management of Munchausen syndrome. Gen Hosp Psychiatry. 2003;25:358–363. doi:10.1016/S0163-8343(03)00061-6 [CrossRef]
  10. Galanos J, Perera S, Smith H, et al. Bacteremia due to three Bacillus species in a case of Munchausen’s syndrome. J Clin Microbiol. 2003;41:2247–2248. doi:10.1128/JCM.41.5.2247- 2248.2003 [CrossRef]
  11. Haddad SA, Winer KK, Gupta A, et al. A puzzling case of anemia. Transfusion. 2002;42:1610–1613. doi:10.1046/j.1537-2995.2002.00269.x [CrossRef]
  12. Mehta NJ, Khan IA. Cardiac Munchausen syndrome. Chest. 2002;122:1649–1653. doi:10.1378/chest.122.5.1649 [CrossRef]
  13. Ehrlich S, Pfeiffer E, Salbach H, Lenz K, Lehmkuhl U. Factitious disorder in children and adolescents: a retrospective study. Psychosomatics. 2008;49:392–398. doi:10.1176/appi.psy.49.5.392 [CrossRef]
  14. Ozmen S, Ozmen OA, Yilmaz T. Clear otorrhea: a case of Munchausen syndrome in a pediatric patient. Eur Arch Otorhinolaryngol. 2008;265:837–838. doi:10.1007/s00405-007- 0527-2 [CrossRef]
  15. Rashid N. Medically unexplained myopathy due to ipecac abuse. Psychosomatics. 2006;47:167–169. doi:10.1176/appi.psy.47.2.167 [CrossRef]
  16. Goodspeed RB, Lee BY. What if …: you think a patient is faking?J Ambul Care Manage. 2010;33:357–359. doi:10.1097/JAC.0b013e3181f533c4 [CrossRef]
  17. Eisenhofer G. Pheochromocytoma or Münchausen syndrome: the masquerade is up. Clin

Auton Res. 2010;20:211–212. doi:10.1007/s10286-010-0067-5 [CrossRef]

  1. Van Dinter TG Jr, Welch BJ. Diagnosis of Munchausen’s syndrome by an electronic health

    record search. Am J Med. 2009;122:e3. doi:10.1016/j.amjmed.2009.03.035 [CrossRef]

  2. Matrana MR, McDonald PF, Rostlund E. Severe hypokalemia and hematuria: a case of

    Munchausen’s syndrome. J La State Med Soc. 2011;163:21–25.

  3. Archambault-Grenier MA, Roy J, Beauchemin N, et al. Munchausen’s syndrome in the allogeneic stem cell transplantation setting: a rare but potentially devastating condition. Bone Marrow Transplant. 2010;45:600–601. doi:10.1038/bmt.2009.192 [CrossRef]
  4. Griffiths EJ, Kampa R, Pearce C, Sakellariou A, Solan MC. Munchausen’s syndrome by Google. Ann R Coll Surg Engl. 2009;91:159–160. doi:10.1308/003588409X391938 [CrossRef]
  5. Ogbonmwan SE, Abidogun K. A variant of Munchausen syndrome presenting as a gynaecological emergency. Br J Hosp Med (Lond). 2008;69:414–415. doi:10.12968/hmed.2008.69.7.30421 [CrossRef]
  6. Ansari H, Garibaldi DC, Jun AS. Anaesthetic abuse keratopathy as a manifestation of ocular Munchausen’s syndrome. Clin Experiment Ophthalmol. 2006;34:81–83. doi:10.1111/j.1442- 9071.2006.01152.x [CrossRef]
  7. Park TA, Borsch MA, Dyer AR, Peiris AN. Cardiopathia fantastica: the cardiac variant of Munchausen syndrome. South Med J. 2004;97:48–52. doi:10.1097/01.SMJ.0000076704.01274.0F [CrossRef]
  8. Kanaan RA, Wessely SC. Factitious disorders in neurology: an analysis of reported cases. Psychosomatics. 2010;51:47–54. doi:10.1016/S0033-3182(10)70658-7 [CrossRef]
  9. Okuniewska A, Walczuk BI, Czubek M, Biernat W. Recurrent deep ulcers resembling rare cancers as a form of factitious disorder. Acta Derm Venereol. 2011;91:341–342. doi:10.2340/00015555-1027 [CrossRef]
  10. Misra D, Bednar M, Cromwell C, Marcus S, Aledort L. Manifestations of superwarfarin ingestion: a plea to increase awareness. Am J Hematol. 2010;85:391–392.
  11. Yonge O, Haase M. Munchausen syndrome and Munchausen syndrome by proxy in a student nurse. Nurse Educ. 2004;29:166–169. doi:10.1097/00006223-200407000-00013 [CrossRef]
  12. Cunningham JM, Feldman MD. Munchausen by Internet: current perspectives and three new cases. Psychosomatics. 2011;52:185–189. doi:10.1016/j.psym.2010.11.005 [CrossRef]
  13. Kenedi CA, Shirey KG, Hoffa M, et al. Laboratory diagnosis of factitious disorder: a systematic review of tools useful in the diagnosis of Munchausen’s syndrome. N Z Med J. 2011;124:66–81.
  14. Robertson MD, Kerridge IH. Through a glass, darkly: the clinical and ethical implications of Munchausen syndrome. Med J Aust. 2009;191:217–219.
  15. Pao D, McElborough D, Fisher M. Primary HIV infection masquerading as Munchausen’s syndrome. Sex Transm Infect. 2005;81:359–360. doi:10.1136/sti.2004.013300 [CrossRef]
  1. Alicandri-Ciufelli M, Moretti V, Ruberto M, Monzani D, Chiarini L, Presutti L. Otolaryngology fantastica: the ear, nose, and throat manifestations of Munchausen’s syndrome. Laryngoscope. 2012;122:51–57. doi:10.1002/lary.22373 [CrossRef]
  2. Feldman MD, Hamilton JC. Mastectomy resulting from factitious disorder. Psychosomatics. 2007;48:361. doi:10.1176/appi.psy.48.4.361 [CrossRef]
  3. Cheng TO. Munchausen syndrome presenting as cardiovascular disease (cardiopathia fantastica). Am J Cardiol. 2003;91:1290.
  4. Rabinerson D, Kaplan B, Orvieto R, Dekel A. Munchausen syndrome in obstetrics and gynecology. J Psychosom Obstet Gynaecol. 2002;23:215–218. doi:10.3109/01674820209074675 [CrossRef]
  5. Eisendrath SJ, McNiel DE. Factitious physical disorders, litigation, and mortality. Psychosomatics. 2004;45:350–353. doi:10.1176/appi.psy.45.4.350 [CrossRef]
  6. Croft PR, Racz MI, Bloch JD, et al. Autopsy confirmation of severe pulmonary interstitial fibrosis secondary to Munchausen syndrome presenting as cystic fibrosis. J Forensic Sci. 2005;50:1194–1198. doi:10.1520/JFS2005001 [CrossRef]
  7. Turner J, Reid S. Munchausen syndrome. Lancet. 2002;359:346–349. doi:10.1016/S0140- 6736(02)07502-5 [CrossRef]
  8. Medical Board of Australia. Code of conduct: Good medical practice: a code of conduct for doctors in Australia. http://www.medicalboard.gov.au/Codes-Guidelines-Policies/Code-of- conduct.aspx. Accessed December 17, 2015.
  9. Steinwender C, Hofmann R, Kypta A, Leisch F. Recurrent symptomatic bradycardia due to secret ingestion of beta-blockers–a rare manifestation of cardiac Münchhausen syndrome. Wien Klin Wochenschr. 2005;117:647–650. doi:10.1007/s00508-005-0419-7 [CrossRef]
  10. Crawford SM, Jeyasanger G, Wright M. A visitor with Munchausen’s syndrome. Clin Med. 2005;5:400–401. doi:10.7861/clinmedicine.5-4-400 [CrossRef]
  11. Feldman MD, Peychers ME. Legal issues surrounding the exposure of “Munchausen by Internet.”Psychosomatics. 2007;48:451–452. doi:10.1176/appi.psy.48.5.451-a [CrossRef]
  12. Vaglio JC, Schoenhard JA, Saavedra PJ, Williams SR, Raj SR. Arrhythmogenic Munchausen syndrome culminating in caffeine-induced ventricular tachycardia. J Electrocardiol. 2011;44:229–231. doi:10.1016/j.jelectrocard.2010.08.006 [CrossRef]
  13. Moery S, Pontious JM. Coagulopathy associated with superwarfarin exposure. J Okla State Med Assoc. 2009;102:323–325.
  14. Livaoglu M, Kerimoglu S, Hocaoglu C, Arvas L, Karacal N. Munchausen’s syndrome: a rare self-mutilation syndrome. Dermatol Surg. 2008;34:1288–1291. doi:10.1097/00042728- 200809000-00024 [CrossRef]
  15. Ameh V, Speak N. Factitious hypoglycaemia in a nondiabetic patient. Eur J Emerg Med. 2008;15:59–60. doi:10.1097/MEJ.0b013e3282aa3f70 [CrossRef]
  16. Fonteyn N, Wauters G, Vandercam B, et al. Mycobacterium mucogenicum sepsis in an immunocompetent patient. J Infect. 2006;53:e143–e146. doi:10.1016/j.jinf.2005.11.015

[CrossRef]

  1. Salvo M, Pinna A, Milia P, Carta F. Ocular Munchausen syndrome resulting in bilateral

    blindness. Eur J Ophthalmol. 2006;16:654–656.

  2. Lad SP, Jobe KW, Polley J, Byrne RW. Munchausen’s syndrome in neurosurgery: report of

    two cases and review of the literature. Neurosurgery. 2004;55:1436.

  3. Imrie FR, Church WH. Factitious keratoconjunctivitis (not another case of ocular Munchausen’s syndrome). Eye (Lond). 2003;17:256–258. doi:10.1038/sj.eye.6700235 [CrossRef]
  4. Gregory RJ, Jindal S. Factitious disorder on an inpatient psychiatry ward. Am J Orthopsychiatry. 2006;76:31–36. doi:10.1037/0002-9432.76.1.31 [CrossRef]
  5. Fehnel CR, Brewer EJ. Munchausen’s syndrome with 20-year follow-up. Am J Psychiatry. 2006;163:547. doi:10.1176/appi.ajp.163.3.547-a [CrossRef]
  6. Kokturk N, Ekim N, Aslan S, Kanbay A, Acar AT. A rare cause of hemoptysis: factitious disorder. South Med J. 2006;99:186–187. doi:10.1097/01.smj.0000198266.97677.b0 [CrossRef]
  7. Elmore JL. Munchausen syndrome: an endless search for self, managed by house arrest and mandated treatment. Ann Emerg Med. 2005;45:561–563. doi:10.1016/j.annemergmed.2004.11.034 [CrossRef]
  8. Patenaude B, Zitsch R 3rd, Hirschi SD. Blood–but not bleeding–at a tracheotomy site: a case of Munchausen’s syndrome. Ear Nose Throat J. 2006;85:677–679.
  9. Harth W, Taube KM, Gieler U. Factitious disorders in dermatology. J Dtsch Dermatol Ges. 2010;8:361–72.

Authors

Lilian Wong, MD, MPH, is a Pediatric Resident, Department of Pediatrics, Virginia Tech- Carilion School of Medicine. Mark B. Detweiler, MD, MS, is a Staff Psychiatrist, Salem Veterans Affairs Medical Center; and an Associate Professor, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Medicine, Virginia Tech-Carilion School of Medicine.

Address correspondence to Mark B. Detweiler, MD, MS, Veterans Affairs Medical Center (116A7), 1970 Roanoke Boulevard, Salem, VA, 24153; email: Mark.Detweiler1@va.gov.

Disclaimer: The report findings do not represent the views of the Department of Pediatrics, Virginia Tech-Carilion School of Medicine, the Department of Veterans Affairs, or the United States Government.

Disclosure: The authors have no relevant financial relationships to disclose.

Existe Adicção ou Vício em Internet?

Por Dr. Cesar Vasconcellos de Souza Na Revista Americana de Psiquiatria (American Journal of Psychiatry), Março 2008, o Dr. Jerald J. Block, comenta que a Adicção (Dependência) à Internet parece ser uma desordem mental que merece ser incluída na próxima edição da Classificação Internacional das Doenças usada nos EUA (DSM-V), e mostra resultados de pesquisas neste sentido, que irei compartilhar com você agora. O diagnóstico da desordem que engloba o uso compulsivo-impulsivo de computador, seja on line ou off line, consiste de 3 subtipos de vício: jogos excessivos, preocupações sexuais e mensagens tipo email ou textos. E qualquer uma destas modalidades de dependência tem em comum 4 componentes: (1) Excessivo uso, freqüentemente associado com uma perda da noção do tempo ou uma negligência de necessidades básicas; (2) Abstinência, com sintomas de raiva, tensão e/ou depressão quando o computador está inacessível; (3) Tolerância, que inclui a necessidade de obter melhores computadores, melhores softwares, ou mais horas de uso, e (4) Repercussões negativas, incluindo argumentos, mentiras, isolamento social, pobres realizações, e fadiga. Pesquisas sobre vício com Internet têm sido feitas na Coréia do Sul depois que 10 pessoas morreram por problema cardíaco quando elas estavam numa Internet Café (lanhouse) e após assassinatos muito semelhantes ao que existe em video-games. Naquele país considera-se a dependência de Internet um sério problema de saúde pública. Segundo dados do Governo Coreano de 2006, aproximadamente 210 mil crianças sul-coreanas entre 6 e 19 anos de idade, estão sofrendo disto e requerem tratamento. Talvez 80% precisarão medicamentos e 20 a 24% internação hospitalar. Um adolescente sul-coreano gasta em média 23 horas por semana em jogos na Internet e há um aumento do número de jovens que faltam aulas ou o trabalho para ficar mais tempo no computador. Por isso, até Junho 2007 eles treinaram 1043 conselheiros para o tratamento de vício em Internet, e estão introduzindo métodos preventivos nas escolas. Na China, de acordo com Dr. Block, 13,7% dos adolescentes chineses encaixam no diagnóstico de adicção pela Internet, o que dá cerca de 10 milhões de jovens. Já nos Estados Unidos, por incrível que parece, ainda faltam dados, porque as pessoas acessam computadores para coisas pessoais muito mais tempo estando em casa, ficando difícil fazer uma estatística apurada. Estima-se que 86% dos viciados em Internet, apresentam algum outro diagnóstico de desordem emocional classificável clinicamente (sob o ponto de vista médico). Consequências deste vício incluem quantidade de sono inadequado, atrasos no trabalho, ignorar obrigações familiares, problemas financeiros e legais, etc. Como saber se uma pessoa está viciada em Internet? Ela precisa responder com um “sim” a 5 das questões abaixo e sem estar num episódio maníaco da doença bipolar: 1) Você se sente preocupado com a Internet (fica pensando nas conexões que fez ou nas que pretende fazer)? 2) Sente necessidade de usar a Internet cada vez mais tempo a fim de obter satisfação? 3) Tem feito repetidos esforços sem sucesso para tentar controlar, cortar, ou parar o uso da Internet? 4) Se sente cansado, de mau humor, deprimido ou irritável quando tenta diminuir ou parar o uso da Internet? 5) Permanece conectado mais tempo do que havia planejado? 6) Tem comprometido ou arriscado a perda de relacionamentos significativos, trabalho, oportunidades educacionais ou de carreira por causa da Internet? 7) Tem mentido para membros de sua família, profissional de saúde ou outros para ocultar a extensão do envolvimento com a Internet? 8) Usa a Internet como um meio de escapar de problemas ou para obter alívio de sentimentos de desajuda, culpa, ansiedade, depressão? Como lutar contra isto? (1) Admitir que existe o problema e estar disposto a mudar, (2) restringir o tempo de uso de computador, (3) avaliar se não se trata de algo secundário a um problema de desenvolvimento (crianças e jovens), (4) pais devem dar bom exemplo não sendo dependentes também de Internet ou outra coisa, (5) as crianças e jovens só devem ter acesso à Internet após realizar as tarefas da casa e da escola, (6) quebrar o padrão de uso do computador, por ex., se a pessoa logo que acorda de manhã vai checar emails, ela pode primeiro tomar um banho, tomar o desjejum, ou se logo que chega em casa após o trabalho/escola acessa a Internet, ela pode primeiro tomar um banho, jantar; (7) colocar um “timer” ou relógio com alarme ligado para certa hora, e ao ele disparar, interromper o uso do computador, (8) avaliação psiquiátrica/psicológica para adultos, pois pode estar ocorrendo um transtorno emocional que leva a pessoa ao vício com Internet.

“>Uma resposta para Existe Adicção ou Vício de Internet?
  1. Pingback: Existe Adicção ou Vício de Internet? « KIAI.med.br

"Vício" – Uso Patológico da Internet? (DSM-V)

Na íntegra no site oficial do Grupo de Discussão que prepara a 5a edição do Manual Estatístico e Diagnóstico da Associação Psiquiátrica Americana (APA)

Esta condição está atualmente necessitando e aguardando novos estudos na Seção III (juntamente com outras categorias na mesma condução), e seria parte do grupo Adicção e Outros Comportamentos Adictivos.

Contudo, na prática Clínica há pelo menos cinco anos e até dez anos, no Brasil, temos recebido número crescente de indivíduos de ambos os sexos procurando reconquistar o controle sobre suas vidas, perdido no mundo virtual, de fato!

Critérios gerais propostos para discussão e pesquisa (nossa tradução livre)

 
A. Preocupação com jogos da Internet

B. Sintomas de abstinência quando a internet é retirada

C. Tolerância: aumento progressivo de tempo jogando na Internet

D. Tentativas frustradas de controlar o uso

E. Uso excessivo continua apesar de reconhecer problemas psicossociais decorrentes

F. Perda de interesses, hobbies anteriores e formas de diversão como resultado do uso maior da Internet

G.    Uso da Internet para escapar ou amenizar humor disfórico ou desconforto emocional

H.     Esconde ou minimiza a quantidade de uso quando indagado a respeito por familiares, terapeutas ou outros

I.     Prejudicou ou perdeu relacionamentos significativos, trabalho, estudos ou oportunidade de carreira por conta do uso de Internet

Publicado de forma adaptada no site da Clínica Feminina Vitoriosos e no blog internacaoinvoluntaria.wordpress.com

Novo Paradigma – Prévia dos Novos Critérios Diagnósticos para Dependência Química no DSM-V

Os novos critérios diagnósticos propostos pelo grupo de especialistas que prepara a 5ª Edição do Manual Estatístico e Diagnóstico (DSM-V) da Associação de Psiquiatria Americana – APA (veja aqui) representam uma verdadeira mudança de paradigma no entendimento da problemática com álcool e drogas.
 

O próprio título da categoria diagnóstica possivelmente será alterado – Adicção e Transtornos Relacionados, aumentando sua abrangência, e possibilitando talvez a intervenção em estágios mais precoces da doença, já que acabaria a dicotomia entre Dependência Química e Uso Abusivo de Substâncias.

Outra proposta seria a inclusão da fissura (ou craving) como um critério diagnóstico – anteriormente tal sintoma só estava presente na Classificação Internacional de Doenças (CID-10) da Organização Mundial de Saúde (OMS).

 

Será incluído dentro da categoria o diagnóstico do Jogo Patológico, por exemplo, anteriormente incluído no grupo dos Transtornos Relacionados ao Controle do Impulso). Se em termos psicobiológicos não existe dúvida do acometimento da mesma via mesolímbica dopamigérgica (Circuito de Recompensa ou Via do Prazer), o mecanismo comportamental do Jogo Patológico é baseado no condicionamento por reforços intermitentes – ao passo que drogas de abuso ou sexo trazem a satisfação imediata, intensa e fugaz, o jogador somente vivencia o prazer da vitória em raríssimos momentos – a expectativa de conseguir o reforço positivo seria suficiente (em indivíduos predispostos geneticamente, ao menos) para desenvolver toda uma gama de comportamentos disfuncionais.

 

Por fim, será incluida uma sub-categoria para Síndrome de Abstinência à Cannabis/Maconha – evidências científicas em modelos animais e a experiência clínica dos especialistas serão finalmente codificadas no Manual Estatístico Diagnóstico da Associação de Psiquiatria Americana, alterando de forma importante o entendimemto sobre essa substância psicotrópica e seus efeitos a médio e longo prazo (apesar da volumosa bagagem de estudos publicados, ainda persistia a crença da ausência de um quadro físico de abstinência da cannabis, o que abria margem para leigsos e mesmo profissionais da saúde questionarem se a droga causaria de fato dependência fisiológica).

 

A seguir uma tradução livre:

Transtornos Relacionados ao Uso de Substâncias (DSM-V)

Padrão maladaptativo de uso de substância levando a prejuízo ou sofrimento significativo, manifestado por 2 (ou mais) dos seguintes critérios, ocorrendo dentro de um período de 12 meses:

1. Uso recorrente de substância resultando em falha no cumprimento de obrigações no trabalho, escola ou em casa (p.ex. faltas repetidas ou baixo desempenho no trabalho relacionados ao uso de substância, faltas, suspensões ou expulsões da escola devido ao uso de substância, negligência nos cuidados do lar ou dos filhos)

2. Uso recorrente em situações em que isso pode ser fisicamente perigoso (p.ex. dirigir um automóvel ou operar maquinário enquanto intoxicado pela substância)

3. Uso continuado da substância apesar de problemas recorrentes e persistentes nas esferas social ou interpessoal causados ou exacerbados pelos efeitos da substância (p.ex. discussões com marido/esposa sobre as consequências da intoxicação, brigas físicas)

4. Tolerância, definida por qualquer um dos seguintes aspectos:
(a) uma necessidade de quantidades progressivamente maiores da substância para adquirir a intoxicação ou efeito desejado
(b) acentuada redução do efeito com o uso continuado da mesma quantidade de substância
(Nota: Tolerância não é considerada para aqueles usando medicações sob supervisão e prescrição médica, como analgésicos, antidepressivos, ansiolíticos ou beta-bloqueadores)

5. Abstinência, manifestada por qualquer dos seguintes aspectos:
(a) síndrome de abstinência característica para a substância (consultar os Critérios A e B dos conjuntos de critérios para Abstinência das substâncias específicas)
(b) a mesma substância (ou uma substância estreitamente relacionada) é consumida para aliviar ou evitar sintomas de abstinência
(Nota: Tolerância não é considerada para aqueles usando medicações sob supervisão e prescrição médica, como analgésicos, antidepressivos, ansiolíticos ou beta-bloqueadores)

6. a substância é freqüentemente consumida em maiores quantidades ou por um período mais longo do que o pretendido

7. existe um desejo persistente ou esforços mal-sucedidos no sentido de reduzir ou controlar o uso da substância

8. muito tempo é gasto em atividades necessárias para a obtenção da substância (por ex., consultas a múltiplos médicos ou fazer longas viagens de automóvel), na utilização da substância (por ex., fumar em grupo) ou na recuperação de seus efeitos

9. importantes atividades sociais, ocupacionais ou recreativas são abandonadas ou reduzidas em virtude do uso da substância

10. o uso da substância continua, apesar da consciência de ter um problema físico ou psicológico persistente ou recorrente que tende a ser causado ou exacerbado pela substância (por ex., uso atual de cocaína, embora o indivíduo reconheça que sua depressão é induzida por ela, ou consumo continuado de bebidas alcoólicas, embora o indivíduo reconheça que uma úlcera piorou pelo consumo do álcool).

11. Fissura ou Craving – um forte desejo ou urgência de usar uma substância específica

Especificadores de Gravidade:
Moderado: 2-3 criterios positivos; Grave: 4 ou mais critérios positives
Especificar se: Com (ou Sem) Dependência Fisiológica: evidência de tolerância ou abstinência

 

Tema exposto pelo autor em Mesa Redonda no Congresso Latino-Americano de Análise e Modificação do Comportamento (CLAMOC) de 2010

Publicado de forma adaptada no blog internacaoinvoluntaria.wordpress.com e da Clínica Feminina Vitoriosos

Quando o Uso Deixa de Ser Recreativo – Critérios Diagnósticos para Abuso de Substâncias de acordo com o DSM-IV

Publicado de forma adaptada no blog internacaoinvoluntaria.wordpress.com e no site da Clínica Feminina Vitoriosos

 

A característica essencial do Abuso de Substância é um padrão mal-adaptativo de uso de substância, manifestado por conseqüências adversas recorrentes e significativas relacionadas ao uso repetido da substância. Pode haver um fracasso repetido em cumprir obrigações importantes relativas a seu papel, uso repetido em situações nas quais isto apresenta perigo físico, múltiplos problemas legais e problemas sociais e interpessoais recorrentes (Critério A).

 

Esses problemas devem acontecer de maneira recorrente, durante o mesmo período de 12 meses. À diferença dos critérios para Dependência de Substância, os critérios para Abuso de Substância não incluem tolerância, abstinência ou um padrão de uso compulsivo, incluindo, ao invés disso, apenas as conseqüências prejudiciais do uso repetido.

 

Um diagnóstico de Abuso de Substância é cancelado pelo diagnóstico de Dependência de Substância, se o padrão de uso da substância pelo indivíduo alguma vez já satisfez os critérios para Dependência para esta classe de substâncias (Critério B). Embora um diagnóstico de Abuso de Substância seja mais provável em indivíduos que apenas recentemente começaram a consumi-la, alguns indivíduos continuam por um longo período de tempo sofrendo as conseqüências sociais adversas relacionadas à substância, sem desenvolverem evidências de Dependência de Substância. A categoria Abuso de Substância não se aplica à nicotina e à cafeína.

 

O indivíduo pode repetidamente apresentar intoxicação ou outros sintomas relacionados à substância, quando deveria cumprir obrigações importantes relativas a seu papel no trabalho, na escola ou em casa (Critério A1).

 

Pode haver repetidas ausências ou fraco desempenho no trabalho, relacionados a “ressacas” recorrentes. Um estudante pode ter ausências, suspensões ou expulsões da escola relacionadas à substância. Enquanto intoxicado, o indivíduo pode negligenciar os filhos ou os afazeres domésticos.

 

A pessoa pode apresentar-se repetidamente intoxicada em situações nas quais isto representa perigo físico (por ex., ao dirigir um automóvel, operar máquinas ou em comportamentos recreativos arriscados, tais como nadar ou praticar montanhismo) (Critério A2).

 

Podem ser observados problemas legais recorrentes relacionados à substância (por ex., detenções por conduta desordeira, agressão e espancamento, direção sob influência da substância) (Critério A3). O indivíduo pode continuar utilizando a substância, apesar de uma história de conseqüências sociais ou interpessoais indesejáveis, persistentes ou recorrentes (por ex., conflito com o cônjuge ou divórcio, lutas corporais ou verbais) (Critério A4).

 

 

Critérios para Abuso de Substância


A. Um padrão mal-adaptativo de uso de substância levando a prejuízo ou sofrimento clinicamente significativo, manifestado por um (ou mais) dos seguintes aspectos, ocorrendo dentro de um período de 12 meses:

(1) uso recorrente da substância resultando em um fracasso em cumprir obrigações importantes relativas a seu papel no trabalho, na escola ou em casa (por ex., repetidas ausências ou fraco desempenho ocupacional relacionados ao uso de substância; ausências, suspensões ou expulsões da escola relacionadas a substância; negligência dos filhos ou dos afazeres domésticos)

(2) uso recorrente da substância em situações nas quais isto representa perigo físico (por ex., dirigir um veículo ou operar uma máquina quando prejudicado pelo uso da substância)

(3) problemas legais recorrentes relacionados à substância (por ex., detenções por conduta desordeira relacionada a substância)

(4) uso continuado da substância, apesar de problemas sociais ou interpessoais persistentes ou recorrentes causados ou exacerbados pelos efeitos da substância (por ex., discussões com o cônjuge acerca das conseqüências da intoxicação, lutas corporais)

 

B. Os sintomas jamais satisfizeram os critérios para Dependência de Substância para esta classe de substância.

 

Related External Links

Critérios Diagnósticos para Dependência Química (DSM-IV)

Publicado de forma adaptada no blog internacaoinvoluntaria e no site da Clínica Feminina Vitoriosos

 

Seguem os critérios diagnósticos para Dependência Química pelo Manual Estatístico e Diagnóstico (DSM-IV) da Associação de Psiquiatria Americana (APA):
Critérios para Dependência de Substância

Um padrão mal-adaptativo de uso de substância, levando a prejuízo ou sofrimento clinicamente significativo, manifestado por três (ou mais) dos seguintes critérios, ocorrendo a qualquer momento no mesmo período de 12 meses:

(1) tolerância, definida por qualquer um dos seguintes aspectos:

(a) uma necessidade de quantidades progressivamente maiores da substância para adquirir a intoxicação ou efeito desejado

(b) acentuada redução do efeito com o uso continuado da mesma quantidade de substância

 

(2) abstinência, manifestada por qualquer dos seguintes aspectos:

(a) síndrome de abstinência característica para a substância (consultar os Critérios A e B dos conjuntos de critérios para Abstinência das substâncias específicas)

(b) a mesma substância (ou uma substância estreitamente relacionada) é consumida para aliviar ou evitar sintomas de abstinência

 

(3) a substância é freqüentemente consumida em maiores quantidades ou por um período mais longo do que o pretendido

 

(4) existe um desejo persistente ou esforços mal-sucedidos no sentido de reduzir ou controlar o uso da substância

 

(5) muito tempo é gasto em atividades necessárias para a obtenção da substância (por ex., consultas a múltiplos médicos ou fazer longas viagens de automóvel), na utilização da substância (por ex., fumar em grupo) ou na recuperação de seus efeitos

 

(6) importantes atividades sociais, ocupacionais ou recreativas são abandonadas ou reduzidas em virtude do uso da substância

 

(7) o uso da substância continua, apesar da consciência de ter um problema físico ou psicológico persistente ou recorrente que tende a ser causado ou exacerbado pela substância (por ex., uso atual de cocaína, embora o indivíduo reconheça que sua depressão é induzida por ela, ou consumo continuado de bebidas alcoólicas, embora o indivíduo reconheça que uma úlcera piorou pelo consumo do álcool).”

Critérios Diagnósticos do Transtorno de Personalidade Borderline (Limítrofe ou Emocionalmente Instável) – DSM-IV

Leia também o texto da Wikipedia publicado integralmente no blog internacaoinvoluntaria.wordpress.com

 

A característica essencial do Transtorno da Personalidade Borderline é um padrão invasivo de instabilidade dos relacionamentos interpessoais, auto-imagem e afetos, e acentuada impulsividade que começa no início da idade adulta e está presente em uma variedade de contextos.

Os indivíduos com Transtorno da Personalidade Borderline fazem esforços frenéticos para evitarem um abandono real ou imaginado (Critério 1). A percepção da separação ou rejeição iminente ou a perda da estrutura externa podem ocasionar profundas alterações na auto-imagem, afeto, cognição e comportamento.

Esses indivíduos são muito sensíveis às circunstâncias ambientais. Eles experimentam intensos temores de abandono e raiva inadequada, mesmo diante de uma separação real de tempo limitado ou quando existem mudanças inevitáveis em seus planos (por ex., reação de súbito desespero quando o clínico anuncia o final da sessão; pânico ou fúria quando alguém que lhes é importante se atrasa apenas alguns minutos ou precisa cancelar um encontro). Eles podem acreditar que este “abandono” implica que eles são “maus”. Esse medo do abandono está relacionado a uma intolerância à solidão e a uma necessidade de ter outras pessoas consigo. Seus esforços frenéticos para evitar o abandono podem incluir ações impulsivas tais como comportamentos de automutilação ou suicidas, que são descritos separadamente no Critério 5.

Os indivíduos com Transtorno da Personalidade Borderline têm um padrão de relacionamentos instáveis e intensos (Critério 2). Eles podem idealizar potenciais cuidadores ou amantes já no primeiro ou no segundo encontro, exigir que passem muito tempo juntos e compartilhar detalhes extremamente íntimos na fase inicial de um relacionamento. Pode haver, entretanto, uma rápida passagem da idealização para a desvalorização, por achar que a outra pessoa não se importa o suficiente, não dá o bastante, não está “ali” o suficiente.

Esses indivíduos podem sentir empatia e carinho por outras pessoas, mas apenas com a expectativa de que a outra pessoa “estará lá” para também atender às suas próprias necessidades, quando exigido. Estes indivíduos estão inclinados a mudanças súbitas e dramáticas em suas opiniões sobre os outros, que podem ser vistos alternadamente como suportes benévolos ou como cruelmente punitivos. Tais mudanças freqüentemente refletem a desilusão com uma pessoa cujas qualidades de devotamento foram idealizadas ou cuja rejeição ou abandono são esperados.

Pode haver um distúrbio de identidade caracterizado por uma auto-imagem ou sentimento de self acentuado e persistentemente instável (Critério 3). Mudanças súbitas e dramáticas são observadas na auto-imagem, caracterizadas por objetivos, valores e aspirações profissionais em constante mudança. O indivíduo pode exibir súbitas mudanças de opiniões e planos acerca da carreira, identidade sexual, valores e tipos de amigos. Esses indivíduos podem mudar subitamente do papel de uma pessoa suplicante e carente de auxílio para um vingador implacável de maus tratos passados.

Embora geralmente possuam uma auto-imagem de malvados, os indivíduos com este transtorno podem, por vezes, ter o sentimento de não existirem em absoluto. Tais experiências habitualmente ocorrem em situações nas quais o indivíduo sente a falta de um relacionamento significativo, carinho e apoio. Esses indivíduos podem apresentar pior desempenho em situações de trabalho ou escolares não estruturados.

Os indivíduos com este transtorno exibem impulsividade em pelo menos duas áreas potencialmente prejudiciais para si próprios (Critério 4). Eles podem jogar, fazer gastos irresponsáveis, comer em excesso, abusar de substâncias, engajar-se em sexo inseguro ou dirigir de forma imprudente. As pessoas com Transtorno da Personalidade Borderline apresentam, de maneira recorrente, comportamento, gestos ou ameaças suicidas ou comportamento automutilante (Critério 5).

O suicídio completado ocorre em 8 a 10% desses indivíduos, e os atos de automutilação (por ex., cortes ou queimaduras), ameaças e tentativas de suicídio são muito comuns. Tentativas recorrentes de suicídio são, freqüentemente, a razão pela qual estes indivíduos buscam auxílio. Tais atos autodestrutivos geralmente são precipitados por ameaças de separação ou rejeição ou por expectativas de que assumam maiores responsabilidades.

A automutilação pode ocorrer durante experiências dissociativas e freqüentemente traz alívio pela reafirmação da capacidade de sentir ou pela expiação do sentimento de ser mau.

Os indivíduos com Transtorno da Personalidade Borderline podem apresentar instabilidade afetiva, devido a uma acentuada reatividade do humor (por ex., disforia episódica intensa, irritabilidade ou ansiedade, em geral durando algumas horas e apenas raramente mais de alguns dias) (Critério 6).

O humor disfórico básico dos indivíduos com Transtorno da Personalidade Borderline muitas vezes é perturbado por períodos de raiva, pânico ou desespero e, raramente, é aliviado por períodos de bem-estar ou satisfação. Esses episódios podem refletir a extrema reatividade do indivíduo a estresses interpessoais. Os indivíduos com Transtorno da Personalidade Borderline podem ser incomodados por sentimentos crônicos de vazio (Critério 7).

Facilmente entediados, podem estar sempre procurando algo para fazer. Os indivíduos com este transtorno freqüentemente expressam raiva intensa e inadequada ou têm dificuldade para controlar sua raiva (Critério 8). Eles podem exibir extremo sarcasmo, persistente amargura ou explosões verbais.

A raiva freqüentemente vem à tona quando um cuidador ou amante é visto como negligente, omisso, indiferente ou prestes a abandoná-lo. Tais expressões de raiva freqüentemente são seguidas de vergonha e culpa e contribuem para o sentimento de ser mau.

Durante períodos de extremo estresse, podem ocorrer ideação paranóide ou sintomas dissociativos transitórios (por ex., despersonalização) (Critério 9), mas estes em geral têm gravidade ou duração insuficiente para indicarem um diagnóstico adicional.

Estes episódios ocorrem mais comumente em resposta a um abandono real ou imaginado. Os sintomas tendem a ser transitórios, durando minutos ou horas. O retorno real ou percebido do carinho da pessoa cuidadora pode ocasionar uma remissão dos sintomas.

Características e Transtornos AssociadosOs indivíduos com Transtorno da Personalidade Borderline podem ter um padrão de boicote a si mesmos quando uma meta está prestes a ser alcançada (por ex., abandonar a escola justo antes da formatura, regredir severamente após uma discussão acerca do sucesso da terapia até o momento atual, destruir um bom relacionamento justamente quando está claro que este poderia ser duradouro).

Alguns indivíduos desenvolvem sintomas tipo psicóticos (por ex., alucinações, distorções da imagem corporal, idéias de referência e fenômenos hipnagógicos) durante períodos de estresse. Os indivíduos com este transtorno podem sentir-se mais seguros com objetos transicionais (isto é, um animal de estimação ou a posse de um objeto inanimado) do que em relacionamentos interpessoais.

A morte prematura por suicídio pode ocorrer em indivíduos com este transtorno, especialmente naqueles com concomitantes Transtornos do Humor ou Transtornos Relacionados a Substâncias. Deficiências físicas podem resultar de comportamentos automutilantes ou tentativas fracassadas de suicídio. Perdas recorrentes de empregos, interrupção dos estudos e casamentos rompidos são comuns.

Abuso físico e sexual, negligência, conflito hostil e perda ou separação parental precoce são mais comuns na história da infância dos indivíduos com Transtorno da Personalidade Borderline. Transtornos concomitantes comuns do Eixo I incluem Transtornos do Humor, Transtornos Relacionados a Substâncias, Transtornos Alimentares (notadamente Bulimia), Transtorno de Estresse Pós-Traumático e Transtorno de Déficit de Atenção/Hiperatividade.

O Transtorno da Personalidade Borderline também co-ocorre freqüentemente com outros Transtornos da Personalidade.

Características Específicas à Cultura, à Idade e ao GêneroO padrão de comportamento visto no Transtorno da Personalidade Borderline foi identificado em diversos contextos, no mundo inteiro. Adolescentes e adultos jovens com problemas de identidade (especialmente quando acompanhados por uso de substâncias) podem exibir, temporariamente, comportamentos que podem ser confundidos com o Transtorno da Personalidade Borderline.

Essas situações são caracterizadas por instabilidade emocional, dilemas “existenciais”, incertezas, escolhas que causam ansiedade, conflitos acerca da orientação sexual e pressões sociais no sentido de decidir-se por uma profissão. O Transtorno da Personalidade Borderline é diagnosticado predominantemente em mulheres (cerca de 75%).

Prevalência
A prevalência do Transtorno da Personalidade Borderline é estimada em cerca de 2% da população geral, cerca de 10% dos indivíduos vistos em clínicas ambulatoriais de saúde mental, e cerca de 20% dos pacientes psiquiátricos internados. A prevalência varia de 30 a 60% entre as populações clínicas com Transtornos da Personalidade.

Curso
Existe uma variabilidade considerável no curso do Transtorno da Personalidade Borderline. O padrão mais comum é de instabilidade crônica no início da idade adulta, com episódios de sério descontrole afetivo e impulsivo e altos níveis de utilização de serviços de saúde mental.

O prejuízo resultante do transtorno e o risco de suicídio são maiores nos anos iniciais da idade adulta e diminuem gradualmente com o avanço da idade. Durante a faixa dos 30 e 40 anos, a maioria dos indivíduos com o transtorno adquire maior estabilidade em seus relacionamentos e funcionamento profissional.

Padrão FamilialO Transtorno da Personalidade Borderline é cerca de cinco vezes mais comum entre os parentes biológicos em primeiro grau dos indivíduos com o transtorno do que na população geral. Existe, também, um risco familiar aumentado para Transtornos Relacionados a Substâncias, Transtorno da Personalidade Anti-Social e Transtornos do Humor.

Diagnóstico DiferencialO Transtorno da Personalidade Borderline freqüentemente co-ocorre com Transtornos do Humor e, quando são satisfeitos os critérios para ambos, os dois podem ser diagnosticados. Uma vez que a apresentação transeccional do Transtorno da Personalidade Borderline pode ser imitada por um episódio de Transtorno do Humor, o clínico deve evitar o diagnóstico adicional de Transtorno da Personalidade Borderline com base apenas na apresentação transeccional, sem ter verificado se o padrão de comportamento tem um início precoce e um curso duradouro.

Outros Transtornos da Personalidade podem ser confundidos com Transtorno da Personalidade Borderline por terem certos aspectos em comum, de modo que é importante distinguir entre esses transtornos com base nas diferenças em seus aspectos característicos. Entretanto, se um indivíduo tem características de personalidade que satisfazem os critérios para um ou mais Transtornos da Personalidade além do Transtorno da Personalidade Borderline, todos podem ser diagnosticados.

Embora o Transtorno da Personalidade Histriônica também possa caracterizar-se por busca de atenção, comportamento manipulador e rápidas mudanças nas emoções, o Transtorno da Personalidade Borderline distingue-se por autodestrutividade, rompimentos raivosos de relacionamentos íntimos e sentimentos crônicos de profundo vazio e solidão. Idéias ou ilusões paranóides podem estar presentes tanto no Transtorno da Personalidade Borderline quanto no Transtorno da Personalidade Esquizotípica, mas estes sintomas são mais transitórios, interpessoalmente reativos e responsivos à estrutura externa no Transtorno da Personalidade Borderline.

Embora o Transtorno da Personalidade Paranóide e o Transtorno da Personalidade Narcisista possam também ser caracterizados por uma reação de raiva a estímulos menores, a relativa estabilidade da auto-imagem, bem como a relativa ausência de autodestrutividade, impulsividade e preocupações com abandono distinguem esses transtornos do Transtorno da Personalidade Borderline.

Embora o Transtorno da Personalidade Anti-Social e oTranstorno da Personalidade Borderline caracterizem-se, ambos, por um comportamento manipulador, os indivíduos com Transtorno da Personalidade Anti-Social manipulam para obter vantagens, poder ou alguma outra gratificação material, ao passo que no Transtorno da Personalidade Borderline o comportamento manipulador se destina mais a envolver as pessoas que o indivíduo considera importantes. Tanto o Transtorno da Personalidade Dependente quanto o Transtorno da Personalidade Borderline caracterizam-se por um medo do abandono; entretanto, o indivíduo com Transtorno da Personalidade Borderline reage ao abandono com sentimentos de vazio emocional, raiva e reclamações, ao passo que o indivíduo com Transtorno da Personalidade Dependente reage com crescente submissão e docilidade e busca urgentemente um relacionamento substituto que lhe dê atenção e cuidados.

O Transtorno da Personalidade Borderline pode ser também distinguido do Transtorno da Personalidade Dependente pelo padrão típico de relacionamentos instáveis e intensos.

O Transtorno da Personalidade Borderline deve ser diferenciado de uma Alteração da Personalidade Devido a uma Condição Médica Geral, na qual os traços emergem devido aos efeitos diretos de uma condição médica geral sobre o sistema nervoso central. Ele também deve ser diferenciado de sintomas que podem desenvolver-se em associação com o uso crônico de uma substância (por ex., Transtorno Relacionado à Cocaína Sem Outra Especificação).

O Transtorno da Personalidade Borderline deve ser distinguido de um Problema de Identidade, um diagnóstico reservado a preocupações quanto à identidade relacionadas a uma fase do desenvolvimento (por ex., adolescência) que não se qualificam como um transtorno mental.


Um padrão invasivo de instabilidade dos relacionamentos interpessoais, auto-imagem e afetos e acentuada impulsividade, que começa no início da idade adulta e está presente em uma variedade de contextos, como indicado por cinco (ou mais) dos seguintes critérios:
(1) esforços frenéticos para evitar um abandono real ou imaginado.
Nota: Não incluir comportamento suicida ou automutilante, coberto no Critério 5[617]
(2) um padrão de relacionamentos interpessoais instáveis e intensos, caracterizado pela alternância entre extremos de idealização e desvalorização
(3) perturbação da identidade: instabilidade acentuada e resistente da auto-imagem ou do sentimento de self
(4) impulsividade em pelo menos duas áreas potencialmente prejudiciais à própria pessoa (por ex., gastos financeiros, sexo, abuso de substâncias, direção imprudente, comer compulsivamente).
Nota: Não incluir comportamento suicida ou automutilante, coberto no Critério 5
(5) recorrência de comportamento, gestos ou ameaças suicidas ou de comportamento automutilante
(6) instabilidade afetiva devido a uma acentuada reatividade do humor (por ex., episódios de intensa disforia, irritabilidade ou ansiedade geralmente durando algumas horas e apenas raramente mais de alguns dias)
(7) sentimentos crônicos de vazio
(8) raiva inadequada e intensa ou dificuldade em controlar a raiva (por ex., demonstrações freqüentes de irritação, raiva constante, lutas corporais recorrentes)
(9) ideação paranóide transitória e relacionada ao estresse ou severos sintomas dissociativos

 

 

Publicado originalmente no site da PsiqWeb

Publicado de forma adaptada site da Clínica Vitoriosos

Related Blogs